Climate Change Marine Impacts

Bleached coral reef.Climate change is altering marine ecosystems in numerous ways, making long-term impacts quite unpredictable. Not only are ocean temperatures rising, but there are changes in nutrient supplies, water chemistry, marine food chains, wind patterns, sea currents, and extreme weather events such as cyclones. In turn, these changes affect marine plants and animals. Environmental changes alter the abundance, distributions, breeding cycles and movements of marine life – including species that billions of people depend on for sustenance and income.

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Blue Mussel

Blue mussels.The blue mussel is an edible marine bivalve mollusc that has been harvested for many centuries. There is evidence that Blue Mussels were farmed as early as 1235 in Europe, though aquaculture on a large scale didn’t kick off until the 19th century and has progressively  developed as technology has advanced. The main producers include the United Kingdom, France, the Netherlands and Ireland.

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Turtle Watch

Green sea turtle.Turtles are under enormous pressure globally. Of the 7 marine species, 6 are listed from vulnerable through to critically endangered. Human impacts such as hunting, boatstrike, climate change, bycatch in fishing gear all impact upon turtles heavily. A story on the 7.30 report highlighted some of the cruel practices turtles face in the northern parts of Australia. It’s horrific and cruel what these turtles endure.

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Fish for the Future

Fish for the future.The ocean’s resources were once thought to be inexhaustible. We now know this is not true. Much of the seafood we depend upon is in serious decline, with a third of global fisheries now classified as overfished. Yet seafood demand is increasing. Choosing sustainable seafood is one thing you can do right now to help our oceans.

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Great Barrier Reef and Climate Change

Bleached and non-bleached coral on the Great Barrier Reef.The Great Barrier Reef is under threat. Climate change, reduced water quality from land-based run-off, coastal development, and fishing effects threaten the health of the Reef. Of these threats, climate change is the biggest and the one over which we seem to have least control. While the climate situation is worsening, some other pressures are easing. For example, pollutant loads entering the Reef have fallen due to better planning and local action.

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Basa

Basa fish.Basa farming is one of the fastest growing types of aquaculture in the world. Basa is also known as Vietnamese Catfish, Mekong River Catfish, Pangasius, Vietnamese River Cobbler, Pacific Dory, White Catfish and Grey Sole. Aquaculture occurs in Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Myanmar. It is closely related to the Tra and the two are often farmed together.

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Deep Sea Perch (Orange Roughy)

Orange Roughy.Orange roughy are also known as deep-sea perch. Commercial fishing of orange roughy initially began around New Zealand and Southeast Australia. The fishery later spread to the Walvis Ridge in the Southeast Atlantic (Namibia) and the Southwest Indian Ocean. Human consumption has risen drastically due to increased supply through new deep-sea trawling techniques.

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